Waiter or Waitress Job Description

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  • On average, waiters and waitresses make $7.14 an hour
  • Tips usually make up most of waiters' and waitresses' pay
  • Waiter and waitress jobs are great for people with outgoing personalities

Are you the type of person who can charm even the grumpiest of old men? Could you carry a hot bowl of soup through a hurricane without breaking a sweat? Then you’ve got what it takes to be a great waiter or waitress. Most waiters and waitresses, also called servers, work in full-service restaurants. They greet customers, take food orders, bring food and drinks to the tables and take payment and make change.

Waitress and waiter job descriptionCasual dining restaurants and caf?s will expect you to be quick, efficient and friendly. Casual dining restaurants can be small family-owned restaurants or larger chain restaurants like Applebee's and Cracker Barrel . You may have to make drinks, salads and desserts all while serving several tables at one time.

Upscale restaurants will require a little more of you. You may need to know about wine and food pairings, understand how each dish is prepared and be able to make food recommendations to customers. Some fine dining restaurants even require servers to prepare specialty food items at a customer's table.

Make no mistake, being a waiter or waitress is hard work. You will have to deal with rude customers, screaming children and people who don't tip. You will roll a lot of silverware and clean a lot of ketchup bottles. Your feet will hurt. But it's a great career for someone who likes to work with people, and waiting tables can be great money for someone with the right mix of personality and serving skills.

How much do waiters and waitresses make?

Since most of your pay will likely come from tips, the better a server you are, the more money you'll make. But on average, waiters and waitresses make $7.14 an hour. The minimum a restaurant can pay you is $2.13 an hour - the rest of your pay will come from tips. However, if you score a job in a busy, expensive restaurant, you can make upwards of $20 an hour on a good night. Beware, though: if you get stuck with bad tippers or a bad shift you can end up walking out with little or no money.

Education requirements

You'll be getting a lot of on-the-job training as a server, but for the most part, no formal education is required. Some do require that you have a high school diploma. Having a bachelor's degree is always a plus - especially if you want to end up in a fine dining restaurant or eventually enter management.

Career paths for waiters and waitresses

After working your way up to a coveted shift at your first waiter or waitress job , it's likely that you'll move on to a better-paying server position at a different restaurant. After working there for a few years, you may transition into a managerial role. Some restaurants have a formal manager training program, while others require several years of experience before promoting servers.

The future of waiter and waitress jobs

People like to go out to eat, and that's not going to change anytime soon. According to the BLS (Bureau of Labor Statistics), there will be nearly 2.6 million waiter and waitress jobs available by the year 2016, which is 13 percent more than are available now.

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Stock Clerk Job Description

  • Stock clerk job descriptionStock clerks average around $10 per hour.
  • Jobs as a stock clerk offer decent job security.
  • You'll need to be hard-working, physically fit and an independent worker.

What do stock clerks do?

Have you ever wondered how all the cans of green beans get on the shelves at the grocery store, or where store employees go when you ask them to "check in the back?" If you enjoy working behind the scenes, being a stock clerk just might be the perfect job for you.

A stock clerk is responsible for stocking shelves and maintaining the overall appearance of the store. That means you'll have to unload trucks and move the merchandise to the floor quickly and efficiently. You may be responsible for planograms (setting up the shelves according to company specifications), which means you'll need a good eye for detail. This is also the kind of job where your boss probably won't be looking over your shoulder. If you work well independently and you can motivate yourself to complete an assigned task from start to finish (without getting distracted), this will be perfect for you.

Some of these tasks can be completed when the store is open, but others have to happen early in the morning or late at night. Shifts are typically available around the clock, so this job offers is perfect for someone needing scheduling flexibility.

To be a stock clerk, you'll also need to physically be able to perform the tasks assigned to you. This means some heavy lifting, stooping, bending, and even climbing ladders. If you have a bad back, or if you're afraid of heights (10 to 20 feet), this probably isn't the job for you.

Employers will expect you to be hard-working and good with customers (especially if you work a day shift). You will be in the aisles stocking the shelves, so you'll be the very first person customers ask when they need to know what aisle the canned rutabaga is on (aisle 12, second shelf on the right).

How much do stock clerks make?

The average hourly pay for a stock clerk is usually around $10 per hour. This varies by industry, with warehouse and storage clerks making the most ($13.34 per hour) and department stores having the lowest hourly wage (around $9.29 per hour).

Education requirements

A high school diploma or GED is sufficient education for a stock clerk position. Most employers will offer short-term, on-site training so you can learn the job according to their specifications.

Career paths for stock clerks

Working in a large store (like a supermarket or department store) may lead to a wealth of growth opportunities in the store you work in and throughout the organization. Because each location consists of so many separate departments, there are lots of different management opportunities in each. For stocking positions there are typically shift supervisors and an operations or inventory manager assigning daily job functions. Each store will also have a general manager who oversees all aspects of the store; this position would likely require additional education (at least a bachelor's degree) and several years of job training.

The future of stock clerk jobs

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment of stock clerks is expected to grow a little more than 7 percent between 2008 and 2018. Grocery and retail clerk positions are expected to grow the most and are among the only types of clerk positions that expect substantial growth. The position offers job security and growth opportunities.

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Counter Attendant Job Description

What is a counter attendant job?On average, counter attendants make around $8.50 per hour. Part of counter attendants' hourly wage is based on tips they receive, and most counter attendants work nights and weekends.

What do counter attendants do?

Counter attendant is a term used to describe the job of those who stand behind a counter and take your order (usually food). These jobs are most commonly found at movie theaters, specialty food stores (like ice cream shops) or cafeterias.

Those working counter attendant jobs are often required to handle food and beverages throughout their shifts. Often these items are ready made or easy to assemble. To be a successful counter attendant, you'll need to be able to take orders from customers and deliver them back to the customers accurately.

Counter attendants are required to stand on their feet for their entire shift and occasionally lift heavy boxes, so being physically able to complete these aspects of the job is necessary.

How much do counter attendants make?

The average salary for all counter attendants is about $8.50 per hour, but the total varies based on tips received. Counter attendants with a higher hourly base wage and generous tipping customers can earn up to $12 per hour.

What are the education requirements?

Counter attendants do not have any specific education requirements. To be promoted into supervisory positions, you will need a high school diploma or GED. All of the tasks and job functions can be learned quickly with on-the-job training.

Career paths for counter attendants

You don't have to want to be a counter attendant forever, or even work in the industry to work as a counter attendant. Many people use jobs as counter attendants to acquire valuable customer service and cashiering skills for other jobs. If you do find a company you really like to work for as a counter attendant, managerial roles are often available for those who excel in their starting positions.

The future of counter attendants

The BLS (Bureau of Labor Statistics) expects an increase in counter attendant positions over the 2008-2018 decade corresponding to population growth. This normal growth will be compounded by the increasing popularity of families to choose take-out over dine-in restaurants.

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Lifeguard Job Description

  • Lifeguard job descriptionLifeguards average around $9.25 per hour
  • Most lifeguards work less than 40 hours per week
  • You'll need to get certified to be a lifeguard

If Michael Phelps fell in love with Wonder Woman, their baby would make a great lifeguard. Seriously, who doesn’t want to save lives (translation: be a hero) and get a tan at the same time? Lifeguard jobs could have you touring the world on a cruise ship, chilling in the summer sun at your local pool, or living out your beach bum fantasy all summer long.

Most lifeguards don't work 40 hours a week. You'll have to work nights and weekends, probably irregular hours, and the work is largely seasonal, so it's not a job for everyone. Typically about 40 percent of all recreational workers work part time.

Being a lifeguard means you're trusted with the lives of others, so you'll need to be extremely responsible, attentive, and patient ("No running! Slow down!"). You'll be rewarded for your hard work with cases of Fla-Vor-Ice pops, microwave snack-bar pizza and a shiny whistle, which is awesome.

How much do lifeguards make?

The average hourly pay for all lifeguards is around $9.25 per hour, but will vary by experience and location. Experienced beach lifeguards can earn $16 per hour or more.

Education requirements

A high school diploma or GED is typically not required for most lifeguard jobs. You will probably need some sort of certification, however, from the Red Cross or another training program. Lots of employers require lifeguards to pass a certification test. This test includes both physical challenges and a written exam to ensure you're capable of performing the necessary duties of the job. Training and certification details vary depending on where you live, but you can find out exactly what the requirements are from your local parks and recreation department.

Career paths for lifeguards

Most people who work guarding lives don't do it for the outrageous career growth prospects. Lifeguarding is a solid summer job, though it can lead to year-round work at an indoor pool. If you're looking to get into a job in parks and recreation, though, this could be your stepping stone. For public pools, a team of lifeguards will typically be supervised by a manager who then reports to an official within the parks and recreation department. At private pools or clubs, lifeguards report to a direct supervisor or manager.

The future of lifeguard jobs

According to the BLS (Bureau of Labor Statistics), job opportunities for recreational workers are set to grow faster than normal. Even though people will be spending more on recreation, budget restrictions may keep state and local governments from investing in the programs that fund public pools.

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Cashier Job Description

Cashier job descriptionMany cashiers make minimum wage. Almost half of all cashiers work part time, and cashier jobs are expected to decrease in the next few years.

What do cashiers do?

Cashiers work in a variety of places including supermarkets, retail stores, gas stations, movie theaters and restaurants. As a cashier you'll probably use a cash register to ring people up, take their money and give them their change and a receipt. You might also have to wrap or bag their purchase. Cashiers sometimes handle returns and exchanges.

At the end of a shift, you'll have to count the money in your cash register and compare it with the sales data in the computer. Be careful with your money - although you probably won't get in trouble for occasionally being a few cents short, you could get fired if it happens too often.

Depending on where you work, you might have other responsibilities as well. If you're a cashier at a supermarket, you might be asked to clean your area as well as return unwanted items to shelves. If you work at a convenience store, you might have to create money orders and sell lottery tickets.

Almost half of all cashiers work part time. Most cashiers are asked to work weekends, evenings and holidays.

How much do cashiers make?

Many cashiers make the federal minimum wage, which just went up to $7.25 an hour. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), most cashiers make between $6.99 and $9.44 an hour. The highest paid cashiers can earn more than $14.50 an hour. See how much cashiers earn in your area .

What are the education requirements?

Most cashiers have a high school diploma or the GED equivalent. No higher education is required to be a cashier, but taking business classes or getting your associate's degree can help you if you eventually want to be a manager.

Career paths for cashiers

Cashier career paths can vary. If you've started out in a part-time position learning all you can about the business and practicing good customer service can lead to a full-time position. After that, hard work can lead to opportunities as a head cashier, or even as a manager.

The future of cashier jobs

According to the BLS, most cashier jobs are expected to see a decline in the next few years with the exception of gaming cashier jobs, which will increase. No need to worry though, there will be plenty of full-time and part-time cashier jobs still available because the BLS expects a good number of cashiers to leave their current jobs.

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Camp Counselor Job Description

Camp counselor job descriptionCamp counselors earn an average of $7.50 per hour. There are no educational requirements (though specialties in crafts, sports or other activities are useful). Having an upbeat attitude is a must!

What do camp counselors do?

You always knew your talent for building s'mores would come in handy; what better way to share your gift than teaching kids to create their own marshmallow masterpieces around a crackling campfire? If you can distinguish poison ivy from harmless underbrush, win staring contests with large spiders, or if the idea of being on a bus full of kids singing 'The Song that Never Ends' makes you grin instead of grimace, you're well on your way to being an awesome camp counselor!

Positive attitude and a genuine enthusiasm for working with children are vital whether you are a day camp counselor or an overnight camp counselor. Counselors are typically hired as recreation leaders (who supervise general camp operations) or as activity specialists (who teach various subjects including archery, crafts, horseback riding, etc.). Either way, being a summer camp counselor is a great opportunity to build leadership skills while spending the season outdoors. Just be sure to come prepared with rain gear, sunscreen and bug spray; you'll be working in all sorts of weather conditions.

How much do camp counselors make?

Camp counselors make around $7.50 per hour. Many camp positions are seasonal or part time, making this an ideal job for high school and college students who are looking for work during summer vacation.

What are the education requirements?

There are no specific educational requirements for summer camp counselors, but CPR and First Aid Certification are encouraged (and might give you an edge over other applicants). Employers often have counselor in training (CIT) programs set up to show new camp counselors the ropes. In addition to certifications and training, patience is critical for recreation leaders; your campers may be away from home for the first time, and it's your job to calm their nerves and make sure everyone has a great experience. If you enjoy teaching and have talents in sports, crafts or the arts, you are well positioned to become a recreation specialist.

Career paths for camp counselors

Full-time positions are limited and competition can be strong, but there are a variety of opportunities for advancement in the recreational field. Recreation supervisors manage camp counselors, organize and oversee camp activities, and report to the director. Directors of recreation typically hold a graduate degree and are responsible for managing budgets and overall programming.

Experience as a summer camp counselor can also serve as a starting point for related positions in the park industry, daycare or cruise recreation.

The future of camp counselors

The BLS (Bureau of Labor Statistics) expects faster than average growth in recreational job opportunities over the 2008-2018 decade. Individuals, sports organizations and civil groups are spending money on recreation, but new government funded positions will be limited.

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