Waiter or Waitress Job Description

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  • On average, waiters and waitresses make $7.14 an hour
  • Tips usually make up most of waiters' and waitresses' pay
  • Waiter and waitress jobs are great for people with outgoing personalities

Are you the type of person who can charm even the grumpiest of old men? Could you carry a hot bowl of soup through a hurricane without breaking a sweat? Then you’ve got what it takes to be a great waiter or waitress. Most waiters and waitresses, also called servers, work in full-service restaurants. They greet customers, take food orders, bring food and drinks to the tables and take payment and make change.

Waitress and waiter job descriptionCasual dining restaurants and caf?s will expect you to be quick, efficient and friendly. Casual dining restaurants can be small family-owned restaurants or larger chain restaurants like Applebee's and Cracker Barrel . You may have to make drinks, salads and desserts all while serving several tables at one time.

Upscale restaurants will require a little more of you. You may need to know about wine and food pairings, understand how each dish is prepared and be able to make food recommendations to customers. Some fine dining restaurants even require servers to prepare specialty food items at a customer's table.

Make no mistake, being a waiter or waitress is hard work. You will have to deal with rude customers, screaming children and people who don't tip. You will roll a lot of silverware and clean a lot of ketchup bottles. Your feet will hurt. But it's a great career for someone who likes to work with people, and waiting tables can be great money for someone with the right mix of personality and serving skills.

How much do waiters and waitresses make?

Since most of your pay will likely come from tips, the better a server you are, the more money you'll make. But on average, waiters and waitresses make $7.14 an hour. The minimum a restaurant can pay you is $2.13 an hour - the rest of your pay will come from tips. However, if you score a job in a busy, expensive restaurant, you can make upwards of $20 an hour on a good night. Beware, though: if you get stuck with bad tippers or a bad shift you can end up walking out with little or no money.

Education requirements

You'll be getting a lot of on-the-job training as a server, but for the most part, no formal education is required. Some do require that you have a high school diploma. Having a bachelor's degree is always a plus - especially if you want to end up in a fine dining restaurant or eventually enter management.

Career paths for waiters and waitresses

After working your way up to a coveted shift at your first waiter or waitress job , it's likely that you'll move on to a better-paying server position at a different restaurant. After working there for a few years, you may transition into a managerial role. Some restaurants have a formal manager training program, while others require several years of experience before promoting servers.

The future of waiter and waitress jobs

People like to go out to eat, and that's not going to change anytime soon. According to the BLS (Bureau of Labor Statistics), there will be nearly 2.6 million waiter and waitress jobs available by the year 2016, which is 13 percent more than are available now.

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Telemarketer Job Description

  • Telemarketer job descriptionOn average, telemarketers make around $10.50 per hour
  • Job opportunities for telemarketers are decreasing
  • Most telemarketers need a background in sales

What do telemarketers do?

Telemarketers get a bad rap as the annoying sales people that call during the middle of your dinner. While they may interrupt your delicious Salisbury steak and mash occasionally, the largest portion of telemarketing is done during normal business hours directly to businesses.

Telemarketers contact people to solicit sales by reading scripts and describing products. It's just like normal selling, only with telemarketing the shopping experience comes right to you. The end goal is the same: you pitch a product to a customer so well that they want to buy it. The rub here is that sometimes customers don't want the particular product you're advertising brought to them.

If telemarketing is in your future, you're going to need tough skin. When customers feel their privacy or personal time has been invaded, they can become frustrated and angry, so being able to defuse an explosive situation is an important part of the job.

How much do telemarketers make?

The average hourly pay for all telemarketers is about $10.50 per hour, but will vary by experience and location. Experienced telemarketers who successfully sell high-priced products can expect to earn up to $18 per hour.

Education requirements

Education requirements will vary based on the company and product being sold. Some companies may require a bachelor's degree and extensive sales strategy training, while others may substitute relevant work experience for education.

Career paths for telemarketers

Advancement in the telemarketing field depends mostly on how successful you are in your position. Telemarketers who meet and exceed sales targets can be eligible for promotions into training and management positions.

The future of telemarketers

The BLS (Bureau of Labor Statistics) is expecting average growth for telemarketer positions. Because many companies prefer a more personal sales strategy, telemarketing has fallen out of favor. Job growth will remain steady for smaller and independent companies, because unlike larger manufacturers, they won't outsource sales positions.

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Stock Clerk Job Description

  • Stock clerk job descriptionStock clerks average around $10 per hour.
  • Jobs as a stock clerk offer decent job security.
  • You'll need to be hard-working, physically fit and an independent worker.

What do stock clerks do?

Have you ever wondered how all the cans of green beans get on the shelves at the grocery store, or where store employees go when you ask them to "check in the back?" If you enjoy working behind the scenes, being a stock clerk just might be the perfect job for you.

A stock clerk is responsible for stocking shelves and maintaining the overall appearance of the store. That means you'll have to unload trucks and move the merchandise to the floor quickly and efficiently. You may be responsible for planograms (setting up the shelves according to company specifications), which means you'll need a good eye for detail. This is also the kind of job where your boss probably won't be looking over your shoulder. If you work well independently and you can motivate yourself to complete an assigned task from start to finish (without getting distracted), this will be perfect for you.

Some of these tasks can be completed when the store is open, but others have to happen early in the morning or late at night. Shifts are typically available around the clock, so this job offers is perfect for someone needing scheduling flexibility.

To be a stock clerk, you'll also need to physically be able to perform the tasks assigned to you. This means some heavy lifting, stooping, bending, and even climbing ladders. If you have a bad back, or if you're afraid of heights (10 to 20 feet), this probably isn't the job for you.

Employers will expect you to be hard-working and good with customers (especially if you work a day shift). You will be in the aisles stocking the shelves, so you'll be the very first person customers ask when they need to know what aisle the canned rutabaga is on (aisle 12, second shelf on the right).

How much do stock clerks make?

The average hourly pay for a stock clerk is usually around $10 per hour. This varies by industry, with warehouse and storage clerks making the most ($13.34 per hour) and department stores having the lowest hourly wage (around $9.29 per hour).

Education requirements

A high school diploma or GED is sufficient education for a stock clerk position. Most employers will offer short-term, on-site training so you can learn the job according to their specifications.

Career paths for stock clerks

Working in a large store (like a supermarket or department store) may lead to a wealth of growth opportunities in the store you work in and throughout the organization. Because each location consists of so many separate departments, there are lots of different management opportunities in each. For stocking positions there are typically shift supervisors and an operations or inventory manager assigning daily job functions. Each store will also have a general manager who oversees all aspects of the store; this position would likely require additional education (at least a bachelor's degree) and several years of job training.

The future of stock clerk jobs

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment of stock clerks is expected to grow a little more than 7 percent between 2008 and 2018. Grocery and retail clerk positions are expected to grow the most and are among the only types of clerk positions that expect substantial growth. The position offers job security and growth opportunities.

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Retail Associate Job Description

  • post a jobOn average, retail sales associates make $9.50 an hour
  • One-third of retail sales associates work part time
  • Retail sales associates are usually required to work evenings and weekends

What do retail sales associates do?

They're everywhere you shop, assisting you with hard-to-find items, answering questions and ultimately getting you to buy what they're selling. They provide a variety of services, from helping you pick out items to ringing up your purchases. Like cashiers, retail sales associates use cash registers to process transactions and are responsible for keeping track of all the money inside. You might encounter retail sales associates several times a day without realizing it - they work at department stores, grocery stores, cell phone stores and even car dealerships.

You've got to have a lot of patience to make it as a retail sales associate because unfortunately, you will run into your fair share of difficult customers. The most successful sales associates are polite, friendly and have a very outgoing personality. If you're not a naturally happy person who likes to work with others, then retail sales is not for you.

As a retail sales associate you've got to know what you're talking about; if you sell cars, you'll need to know specifics about each car's features, your dealership's financing policy and warranty services. The same goes for people who sell TVs, mattresses and clothing.

Most retail sales associates work indoors - but don't be surprised to find yourself outdoors, sometimes in bad weather, if you decide to sell cars, lumber or gardening equipment. Retail sales associates are on their feet a lot, so comfy shoes are a must.

Long hours and weekends are the norm for retail sales associates. Since most retail stores are busiest in November and December, you'll be required to work nights, weekends and holidays during the busy season.

How much do retail sales associates make?

You can make some pretty good money if you've got the skills. If you score a job with a good commission program and have a knack for sales, you can make upwards of $19 an hour; most car salespeople are in this range. On average, retail sales associates make $9.50 an hour. Be aware that some entry-level jobs will start you out as low as minimum wage, which is just $7.25 an hour.

What are the education requirements to be a retail sales associate?

It's a good rule of thumb that the more education you have, the better. Most entry-level retail sales associate jobs don't require you to have a degree, but most places will require that you have at least a high school diploma. If you're interested in someday becoming a manager, a college degree may be required.

Career paths for retail sales associates

You probably won't get a job selling Porsches right off the bat. Many entry-level sales associates start off selling small-ticket items, such as cosmetics. As they gain experience they move up to bigger items, like electronics and jewelry. After that, it's common to see sales associates move into management positions. A college degree, especially one with a concentration in business, will help you out if you're hoping to be a retail sales manager.

The future of retail sales associate jobs

It's a good time to become a retail sales associate. According to the BLS (Bureau of Labor Statistics), over half a million jobs will be created in the retail sales industry by 2016. Many new jobs will be at supercenters and warehouse clubs as they become more and more popular.

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Landscaper Job Description

  • Landscaper job descriptionOn average, landscapers make around $11 per hour
  • Many landscapers choose to start their own business
  • You won't need more than a high school diploma to get started

What do landscapers do?

Don't listen to what people tell you: having a green thumb is not genetic, and it isn't something that you can come by easily. Some people can't even grow weeds, so if you've been blessed with a green thumb, consider it a heavenly gift and embrace your talent.

Landscapers and groundskeepers do pretty much anything that involves a yard: raking, mowing, trimming, planting, digging, mulching and all sorts of other fun things. It's a landscaper's job to make every yard they touch as pretty as the cover of Better Homes & Gardens.

Many people use the terms landscaper and groundskeeper interchangeably, but you might be surprised to know they aren't the same thing. Technically speaking, a landscaper is someone who creates new landscapes outdoors (planting new flowers, bushes, trees, etc.) while a groundskeeper just keeps what's already there looking nice. Oh, and, if you maintain the grounds on a golf course, you're called a greenskeeper.

It should go without saying that landscapers work where the yards are, which is to say outside. Those with bad allergies, or an aversion to the outdoors, should avoid this job like the plague.

How much do landscapers make?

The average hourly pay for all landscapers is around $11 per hour, but will vary by experience and location. Landscapers with a significant amount of experience and who work for government agencies (which pay really well) can expect to earn up to $14 per hour.

What are the education requirements?

Most landscapers don't need more than a high school diploma to get started. On-the-job skills training will teach you the proper techniques and how to use commercial-grade mowers, sprayers and other equipment. Some of the equipment can be dangerous to operate, so safety training is usually included.

Career paths for landscapers

Larger companies usually have a supervisor overseeing a small group of landscapers. To get into one of these jobs, you'll need to be motivated and have at least a high school education. Many landscapers and supervisors choose to branch out and start their own business after a few years, so if you've got that entrepreneurial itch, this could be an excellent career choice for you. If you see yourself becoming a professional landscape architect or golf course designer, you'll need at least a four-year degree.

The future of landscapers

It's hard for busy working people to find the time to take care of their yard - and when they do have free time, they'd rather spend it relaxing with their family. This desire to reduce "yard" time will increase the need for landscapers and groundskeepers, resulting in an 18 percent growth in available jobs between 2008 and 2018 (Bureau of Labor Statistics).

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Host and Hostess Job Description

Host and hostess job highlights

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  • Nearly 75 percent of hosts and hostesses work part time
  • Slower than average growth is expected for host and hostess jobs
  • On average, hosts and hostesses make $8.42 an hour

What do hosts and hostesses do?

Think about the last time you ate dinner at a sit-down restaurant. Remember the person who greeted you at the door, chatted with you about the weather and then took you to your table? That person was probably a host or hostess.

As a host or hostess you'll be responsible for many things. You'll need to cheerfully greet guests, take them to their table and provide them with silverware and a menu. You'll need to be able to monitor the table rotation and make sure that each member of the wait staff gets a fair amount of tables without giving them too many all at once. At the same time, you'll need to know which servers you can count on to take extra tables when you get slammed with customers. You'll also need to keep track of which tables are cleaned and available for new guests, and you may even be required to answer the phone, take reservations and in some cases take-out orders.

While the hazards of being a host or hostess aren't quite as extreme as those faced by servers, they are similar. A good majority of the people you deal with will be pleasant, but on occasion you'll have to deal with some truly nasty people. You might have guests who will get angry that they can't have the best table in the house - even though it's already taken. Or you'll get guests who try to sneak in last-minute reservations, guests who yell at you because they think you're moving too slowly, and even the occasional irate waiter who is upset at how many tables he has.

If you can't hold your temper, then a host job is probably not right for you. However, if you're looking for a fun part-time job that offers flexibility and a fast-paced working environment, then hosting might just be up your alley - especially if you're just looking for part-time work. Nearly 75% of all hosts and hostesses work part time.

How much do hosts and hostesses make?

Since hosts and hostesses usually don't get any tips, they get paid more per hour than waiters or waitresses do. On average, hosts and hostesses make $8.42 an hour, but depending on the type of restaurant where you work, you could make upwards of $12 an hour. If you're really lucky, you'll also get a share of the tips waiters and waitresses make - typically between three and five percent - and an employee discount on your meals.

What are the education requirements?

Most restaurants require that you have at least a high school education, but if you want to end up in a supervisory role, a college degree will certainly help you out.

Career paths for hosts and hostesses

Many hosts and hostesses work their way into manager jobs. They may become lead hostess, a front-of-house manager or even a maitre d'. An ambitious host or hostess who would like to eventually end up as a general or regional manager - or even restaurant owner - should consider getting a degree in hospitality management.

The future of host and hostess jobs

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), the outlook is less than great for hosts and hostesses. This industry is expected to grow more slowly than average over the next decade. So if you're looking to score a good host or hostess job, then you'll need to have a combination of experience, skill and knowledge.

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Counter Attendant Job Description

What is a counter attendant job?On average, counter attendants make around $8.50 per hour. Part of counter attendants' hourly wage is based on tips they receive, and most counter attendants work nights and weekends.

What do counter attendants do?

Counter attendant is a term used to describe the job of those who stand behind a counter and take your order (usually food). These jobs are most commonly found at movie theaters, specialty food stores (like ice cream shops) or cafeterias.

Those working counter attendant jobs are often required to handle food and beverages throughout their shifts. Often these items are ready made or easy to assemble. To be a successful counter attendant, you'll need to be able to take orders from customers and deliver them back to the customers accurately.

Counter attendants are required to stand on their feet for their entire shift and occasionally lift heavy boxes, so being physically able to complete these aspects of the job is necessary.

How much do counter attendants make?

The average salary for all counter attendants is about $8.50 per hour, but the total varies based on tips received. Counter attendants with a higher hourly base wage and generous tipping customers can earn up to $12 per hour.

What are the education requirements?

Counter attendants do not have any specific education requirements. To be promoted into supervisory positions, you will need a high school diploma or GED. All of the tasks and job functions can be learned quickly with on-the-job training.

Career paths for counter attendants

You don't have to want to be a counter attendant forever, or even work in the industry to work as a counter attendant. Many people use jobs as counter attendants to acquire valuable customer service and cashiering skills for other jobs. If you do find a company you really like to work for as a counter attendant, managerial roles are often available for those who excel in their starting positions.

The future of counter attendants

The BLS (Bureau of Labor Statistics) expects an increase in counter attendant positions over the 2008-2018 decade corresponding to population growth. This normal growth will be compounded by the increasing popularity of families to choose take-out over dine-in restaurants.

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Delivery Driver Job Description

Delivery driver job descriptionJob overview

  • On average, delivery drivers make $13.27 an hour
  • Some delivery driver jobs require special licenses
  • Delivery drivers may have to work evenings and weekends

What do delivery drivers do?

Does the open road call to you? Do you love the feel of the wind in your hair? Then the life of a delivery driver may be the right life for you. Simply put, delivery drivers transport goods from one place to another. There are many different types of drivers, including tractor-trailer drivers, food delivery drivers and small package delivery drivers.

Tractor-trailer drivers handle large amounts of cargo and transport them long distances - sometimes even cross-country. They're responsible for delivering their goods on time, taking care of their truck, refueling and obeying traffic laws. As a tractor-trailer driver, you might transport cars one day, clothing the next and livestock the day after that. One thing is for sure: you'll be on the road more often than not.

We're betting you've seen a food delivery driver or two in your time - after all, pizza delivery drivers fall into this category. As a food delivery driver, you'll deliver food to people's homes, take money and make change. Part of your paycheck will come from tips, so you'll want to be fast and friendly. You'll also need to have your own wheels.

Order anything online lately? It was probably delivered to your doorstep by a small package delivery driver. They work for places like UPS, FedEx and the U.S. Postal Service and are responsible for handling items, delivering them quickly and getting signatures when needed. These drivers usually work daytime hours and have a specific area they cover.

How much do delivery drivers make?

You won't become a millionaire on a delivery driver's salary, but you certainly will be able to pay the bills. On average, delivery drivers make $13.27 an hour. Heavy truck and tractor-trailer drivers make a little more than average: $16.85 an hour. Delivery drivers, on the other hand, (like pizza delivery drivers and dry cleaning delivery drivers) make less than average - about $10 an hour. On average, couriers and other package delivery drivers make between $9 and $25 dollars an hour.

What are the education requirements?

Most places hiring delivery drivers require a high school education, a valid driver's license and a clean driving record. However, if you'd like to drive heavy trucks or tractor trailers, you'll need your CDL (commercial driver's license) and will need to attend special classes.

Career paths for delivery drivers

There are plenty of career opportunities if you've got a passion for driving. Tractor-trailer drivers who are good at what they do can be promoted to a trainer position or even a management position. Local delivery drivers can score coveted delivery routes or work their way into a supervisory role.

The future of delivery driver jobs

As the economy improves, more and more truck drivers will be needed as companies produce more goods. According to the BLS (Bureau of Labor Statistics) over half a million new delivery driver jobs will be created in the next few years.

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Lifeguard Job Description

  • Lifeguard job descriptionLifeguards average around $9.25 per hour
  • Most lifeguards work less than 40 hours per week
  • You'll need to get certified to be a lifeguard

If Michael Phelps fell in love with Wonder Woman, their baby would make a great lifeguard. Seriously, who doesn’t want to save lives (translation: be a hero) and get a tan at the same time? Lifeguard jobs could have you touring the world on a cruise ship, chilling in the summer sun at your local pool, or living out your beach bum fantasy all summer long.

Most lifeguards don't work 40 hours a week. You'll have to work nights and weekends, probably irregular hours, and the work is largely seasonal, so it's not a job for everyone. Typically about 40 percent of all recreational workers work part time.

Being a lifeguard means you're trusted with the lives of others, so you'll need to be extremely responsible, attentive, and patient ("No running! Slow down!"). You'll be rewarded for your hard work with cases of Fla-Vor-Ice pops, microwave snack-bar pizza and a shiny whistle, which is awesome.

How much do lifeguards make?

The average hourly pay for all lifeguards is around $9.25 per hour, but will vary by experience and location. Experienced beach lifeguards can earn $16 per hour or more.

Education requirements

A high school diploma or GED is typically not required for most lifeguard jobs. You will probably need some sort of certification, however, from the Red Cross or another training program. Lots of employers require lifeguards to pass a certification test. This test includes both physical challenges and a written exam to ensure you're capable of performing the necessary duties of the job. Training and certification details vary depending on where you live, but you can find out exactly what the requirements are from your local parks and recreation department.

Career paths for lifeguards

Most people who work guarding lives don't do it for the outrageous career growth prospects. Lifeguarding is a solid summer job, though it can lead to year-round work at an indoor pool. If you're looking to get into a job in parks and recreation, though, this could be your stepping stone. For public pools, a team of lifeguards will typically be supervised by a manager who then reports to an official within the parks and recreation department. At private pools or clubs, lifeguards report to a direct supervisor or manager.

The future of lifeguard jobs

According to the BLS (Bureau of Labor Statistics), job opportunities for recreational workers are set to grow faster than normal. Even though people will be spending more on recreation, budget restrictions may keep state and local governments from investing in the programs that fund public pools.

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Chef or cook

Almost 40 percent of cooks are under the age of 24. One-third of cooks work part time, and chef and cook job opportunities are expected to grow.

What do chefs and cooks do?

post a jobThe short answer? It all depends. Prep cooks, who are at the bottom of the kitchen totem pole, spend their time getting food items ready for the other chefs. They chop vegetables, prepare meats for cooking and weigh and measure ingredients. Line cooks are responsible primarily for cooking the food along with the sous chefs, who are the head chef's second in command. Sous chefs cook, help out the head chef whenever needed and stand in for the head chef during an absence.

A head chef or head cook is the kitchen boss. He or she not only has to be able to cook food and lead a team of kitchen workers but also has to figure out how much food will be needed for the week and order food and supplies. Yes, that means there will be math involved. At some restaurants, head chefs create the restaurant's menu and adjust it depending on the seasonality or availability of food - so being able to cook amazing dishes from scratch is a must.

Chef and cook job descriptionAs fun as that might sound, being a chef is not all glitz and glamour. Chefs and cooks work in a potentially dangerous environment and spend most of their time covered from head to toe in whatever food they happen to be cooking. That means if you end up at a seafood restaurant, you'd better get used to smelling like old shrimp. You'll also be doing more than just cooking - you'll be cleaning and disinfecting many of the items you work with, including grills, fryers and counter surfaces. It's messy work, but someone has to do it.

The hours can be brutal as well. As a chef, you'll be working weekends, early mornings, late evenings and holidays. Almost 33 percent of chefs and cooks work part time.

How much do chefs and cooks make?

We hate to break it to you, but the odds of becoming a celebrity chef and making millions of dollars a year are pretty slim. According to the BLS (Bureau of Labor Statistics), chefs and head cooks make an average of $34,000 a year. But depending on where you work and how much experience you have, you could make up to $60,000 a year.

What are the education requirements?

You might not need an education to get into the restaurant industry , but it certainly doesn't hurt. A vocational school, trade school or training program is a great place to learn the basics. If you really want to learn everything you can about the biz, attend a culinary school or a four-year degree program.

Career paths for chefs and cooks

It's not the easiest job in the world, but it certainly can take you places. If you're a hard worker with a flair for creating food, you could be promoted from line cook to sous chef to head chef within a matter of years. With hard work, a passion for cooking and a little education, chefs and cooks can choose almost any food service career path they like.

The future of chef and cook jobs

It's a pretty good time to be a chef. According to the BLS, chef and cook jobs are expected to increase by 11 percent by 2016, which is about average for all jobs. However, it's going to get tougher for those of you looking to work in high-end restaurants. Culinary school or a college degree program will be necessary if you want to score one of these jobs.

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