Waiter or Waitress Job Description

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  • On average, waiters and waitresses make $7.14 an hour
  • Tips usually make up most of waiters' and waitresses' pay
  • Waiter and waitress jobs are great for people with outgoing personalities

Are you the type of person who can charm even the grumpiest of old men? Could you carry a hot bowl of soup through a hurricane without breaking a sweat? Then you’ve got what it takes to be a great waiter or waitress. Most waiters and waitresses, also called servers, work in full-service restaurants. They greet customers, take food orders, bring food and drinks to the tables and take payment and make change.

Waitress and waiter job descriptionCasual dining restaurants and caf?s will expect you to be quick, efficient and friendly. Casual dining restaurants can be small family-owned restaurants or larger chain restaurants like Applebee's and Cracker Barrel . You may have to make drinks, salads and desserts all while serving several tables at one time.

Upscale restaurants will require a little more of you. You may need to know about wine and food pairings, understand how each dish is prepared and be able to make food recommendations to customers. Some fine dining restaurants even require servers to prepare specialty food items at a customer's table.

Make no mistake, being a waiter or waitress is hard work. You will have to deal with rude customers, screaming children and people who don't tip. You will roll a lot of silverware and clean a lot of ketchup bottles. Your feet will hurt. But it's a great career for someone who likes to work with people, and waiting tables can be great money for someone with the right mix of personality and serving skills.

How much do waiters and waitresses make?

Since most of your pay will likely come from tips, the better a server you are, the more money you'll make. But on average, waiters and waitresses make $7.14 an hour. The minimum a restaurant can pay you is $2.13 an hour - the rest of your pay will come from tips. However, if you score a job in a busy, expensive restaurant, you can make upwards of $20 an hour on a good night. Beware, though: if you get stuck with bad tippers or a bad shift you can end up walking out with little or no money.

Education requirements

You'll be getting a lot of on-the-job training as a server, but for the most part, no formal education is required. Some do require that you have a high school diploma. Having a bachelor's degree is always a plus - especially if you want to end up in a fine dining restaurant or eventually enter management.

Career paths for waiters and waitresses

After working your way up to a coveted shift at your first waiter or waitress job , it's likely that you'll move on to a better-paying server position at a different restaurant. After working there for a few years, you may transition into a managerial role. Some restaurants have a formal manager training program, while others require several years of experience before promoting servers.

The future of waiter and waitress jobs

People like to go out to eat, and that's not going to change anytime soon. According to the BLS (Bureau of Labor Statistics), there will be nearly 2.6 million waiter and waitress jobs available by the year 2016, which is 13 percent more than are available now.

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Telemarketer Job Description

  • Telemarketer job descriptionOn average, telemarketers make around $10.50 per hour
  • Job opportunities for telemarketers are decreasing
  • Most telemarketers need a background in sales

What do telemarketers do?

Telemarketers get a bad rap as the annoying sales people that call during the middle of your dinner. While they may interrupt your delicious Salisbury steak and mash occasionally, the largest portion of telemarketing is done during normal business hours directly to businesses.

Telemarketers contact people to solicit sales by reading scripts and describing products. It's just like normal selling, only with telemarketing the shopping experience comes right to you. The end goal is the same: you pitch a product to a customer so well that they want to buy it. The rub here is that sometimes customers don't want the particular product you're advertising brought to them.

If telemarketing is in your future, you're going to need tough skin. When customers feel their privacy or personal time has been invaded, they can become frustrated and angry, so being able to defuse an explosive situation is an important part of the job.

How much do telemarketers make?

The average hourly pay for all telemarketers is about $10.50 per hour, but will vary by experience and location. Experienced telemarketers who successfully sell high-priced products can expect to earn up to $18 per hour.

Education requirements

Education requirements will vary based on the company and product being sold. Some companies may require a bachelor's degree and extensive sales strategy training, while others may substitute relevant work experience for education.

Career paths for telemarketers

Advancement in the telemarketing field depends mostly on how successful you are in your position. Telemarketers who meet and exceed sales targets can be eligible for promotions into training and management positions.

The future of telemarketers

The BLS (Bureau of Labor Statistics) is expecting average growth for telemarketer positions. Because many companies prefer a more personal sales strategy, telemarketing has fallen out of favor. Job growth will remain steady for smaller and independent companies, because unlike larger manufacturers, they won't outsource sales positions.

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Nurse Job Description

  • Nurse job description60 percent of registered nurses work in hospitals.
  • There are more than 2.6 million nurses in the United States.
  • On average, registered nurses make $62,000 a year.

What do nurses do?

It ain't just fluffing pillows and waiting on doctor's orders. Jobs in nursing demand a lot of the same things as physician jobs do - and then some.

Nursing jobs require not only treating patients who are sick and injured, but also offering advice and emotional support to patients and their families, taking care of paperwork (lots and lots of paperwork), helping doctors diagnose patients and providing advice and follow-up care.

That's right, there's a lot more to nursing than meets the eye. It's one of the hardest and most emotionally draining jobs out there, but it can be incredibly rewarding. There aren't many jobs out there were you can actually save someone's life, but this is one of them. Got a weak stomach? Then consider a different career, my friend. Working as a nurse means having to deal with terribly sick people - and that often involves various bodily fluids (yuck).

How much do nurses make?

Registered nurses who work at hospitals make $63,000 a year, on average. Those who choose to work at nursing homes or with a home healthcare service make around $58,000. That's pretty good money, right? We hate to be cheesy, but the real reward is the feeling you'll get by helping those who need you.

Education requirements

If you want to be a nurse, you've got a good bit of education in your future. Seriously, do you want someone doing a tracheal intubation on you if they don't know what they're doing?

The two most common ways to become a registered nurse are to get a bachelor of science degree in nursing (BSN) or an associate's degree in nursing (ADN). A BSN takes about four years to complete at a college or university. An ADN program at a community or junior college takes about two to three years. After finishing one of these programs you'll also have to pass an exam given by your local licensing board.

Career paths for nurses

Most nurses start out as staff nurses at a hospital. Once you master the art of reading a doctor's handwriting you could move on to a better shift or a shift management role. After that, nurses can advance to assistant unit manager or head nurse. Get an advanced degree and you could find yourself as an assistant director, director, vice president, or chief of nursing.

The future of nurse jobs

According to the BLS (Bureau of Labor Statistics), job opportunities for nurses are growing at a better than average pace. Job prospects will be the best for nurses who choose to work in doctors' offices. They also project that there will be solid opportunities available in nursing and assisted living homes, especially as the baby boomers age.

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Line Cook Job Description

  • post a jobOn average, line cooks make around $14 per hour
  • Work hours will include late nights, early mornings, holidays and weekends
  • Having an associate's degree may give you the edge in your job search

What do line cooks do?

Liking to cook dinner for your friends and loved ones might be a good starting point, but it won't be enough if you want to make it as a line cook. Cooking the same dishes for strangers for a lengthy shift requires more than just a general "like" of the kitchen, you've got to love it.

Line cook job descriptionFor someone looking to get into the restaurant business, especially the "back of the house," a line cook job is a great stepping stone. Line cooks are usually responsible for prepping ingredients and assembling dishes according to restaurant recipes and specifications.

Kitchens can be hot, noisy and stressful places, so you'll need to be able to work efficiently and quickly to be successful as a line cook. It can be a dangerous job, with minor cuts, bruises and burns being a part of the daily (or nightly) routine.

How much do line cooks make?

The average salary for all line cooks is about $14 per hour. Experienced line cooks at high-end restaurants can earn up to $18.25 per hour. The awesome benefit of free meals is not included in your hourly wage. Many line cooks can eat for free during their shifts.

Education requirements to be a line cook?

More and more line cooks and chefs are required to have two and four year degrees. These culinary programs provide basic training on cooking techniques, health and safety procedures, and other various aspects of restaurant management. Most community colleges offer technical classes in culinary arts, with the potential for job placement after completion.

Career paths for line cooks

Career paths for line cooks are often determined by the size and type of restaurant. Some potential promotions in the kitchen include line supervisor, sous-chef, chef and executive chef. Many chefs decide to open their own restaurants or catering businesses. Many advancement opportunities involve moving to bigger or busier restaurants, which may require moving to larger cities.

The future of line cooks

The BLS (Bureau of Labor Statistics) expects a slower than average increase in line cook positions over the 2008-2018 decade. This slow growth will result in fierce competition for available positions, making education and experience important for success.

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