Telemarketer Job Description

  • Telemarketer job descriptionOn average, telemarketers make around $10.50 per hour
  • Job opportunities for telemarketers are decreasing
  • Most telemarketers need a background in sales

What do telemarketers do?

Telemarketers get a bad rap as the annoying sales people that call during the middle of your dinner. While they may interrupt your delicious Salisbury steak and mash occasionally, the largest portion of telemarketing is done during normal business hours directly to businesses.

Telemarketers contact people to solicit sales by reading scripts and describing products. It's just like normal selling, only with telemarketing the shopping experience comes right to you. The end goal is the same: you pitch a product to a customer so well that they want to buy it. The rub here is that sometimes customers don't want the particular product you're advertising brought to them.

If telemarketing is in your future, you're going to need tough skin. When customers feel their privacy or personal time has been invaded, they can become frustrated and angry, so being able to defuse an explosive situation is an important part of the job.

How much do telemarketers make?

The average hourly pay for all telemarketers is about $10.50 per hour, but will vary by experience and location. Experienced telemarketers who successfully sell high-priced products can expect to earn up to $18 per hour.

Education requirements

Education requirements will vary based on the company and product being sold. Some companies may require a bachelor's degree and extensive sales strategy training, while others may substitute relevant work experience for education.

Career paths for telemarketers

Advancement in the telemarketing field depends mostly on how successful you are in your position. Telemarketers who meet and exceed sales targets can be eligible for promotions into training and management positions.

The future of telemarketers

The BLS (Bureau of Labor Statistics) is expecting average growth for telemarketer positions. Because many companies prefer a more personal sales strategy, telemarketing has fallen out of favor. Job growth will remain steady for smaller and independent companies, because unlike larger manufacturers, they won't outsource sales positions.

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