Upping our game

security

Protecting your data is a top priority for us. Which is why we have recently added more security safeguards and doubled down on our security protocols here at Snagajob. As we look for ways to better serve you and our larger marketplace, we have – and will continue to – become even more vigilant in our security efforts.

In the short term, these updates require you to update your Snagajob password at the next log in. Check out some key best practices to proactively help keep your account safe on in our Help Section.

And don't forget to keep checking back here for details on more security efforts we are rolling out in 2017!

 

6 Tips to avoid online job scams

scam-keyboard

It can sometimes be difficult to tell the difference between a real job posting online and a scam posting. After all, scammers tend to advertise job openings in the same places legitimate employers do – online, newspapers, etc. But, if you're careful with your job search and watch out for these red flags, you can easily start to spot the real from the fake.

At Snagajob, we screen each posting that comes through to catch those that might look a litle fishy. If you are unsure of a posting on our site and would like us to investigate, please email besafe@snagajob.com and we will look into it further for you.

No work? No money.

You should not cash any checks or accept any money if you haven't done any work. Job scammers often say they will pay you in advance for miscellaneousitems like office supplies or personal items. These checks are not real and they will bounce. If you are unsure, you can always go to your bank and have them confirm the authenticity of the check.

Share your info wisely.

Applying to many legitimate jobs online requires you to provide a lot of standard information, like your address or Social Security number. However, you should always check to make sure the site you are using to apply is secure. Just make sure the URL of the application begins with "https." And never give your information through email or over the phone.

Stay organized.

Some scammers will post a job under a legitimate company's name, but then contact you as a different, fake company in the hopes you just won't remember all of the jobs you've applied to. Keep a notebook or spreadsheet that lists each position and company you send an application to and don't respond to anyone unfamiliar.

Do your research.

If someone reaches out to you from a company you've never heard of, do a quick internet search to check them out to see if others have been scammed by them. Also, keep an eye out for people who do not have a company domain name in their email address, but instead use a free email service (e.g., XYZ@companyname.com vs. XYZ@gmail.com).

Be weary of IM interviews.

If the employer does not want to meet you face-to-face (whether in person or over video) this is good sign that the job is a scam. In addition, they'll most likely hire you on the spot during the chat interview and ask for your bank account information right away. Never give this information out over an internet chat room.

Trust your gut.

If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is. Pay attention to the pay rate you are being offered and compare it to similar jobs in your area. If they offer to pay you $30 an hour to answer phones at home because their office is under construction, let this be a red flag.

How to spot a scam

Searching for a job can be frustrating as it is, but add in that there are reports of scammers looking for job seekers, it takes the frustration to another level.

We do our best at Snagajob to keep scammers off our site. If you are unsure about a job posting, please contact us with your concerns. You can email besafe@snagajob.com, which goes directly to our Fraud Taskforce who will immediately look into the company.

Check cashing scams

One way scammers are targeting job seekers is through the mail. If you get a letter from a company you have never heard of and have never applied to, do some research before you accept any position. In some cases, they send checks with those letters, informing you that you have been hired as a secret shopper and the check is money to spend at different businesses. They ask you to deposit the check, leave some of the money as a “pay check” and then wire the rest to them. DON’T DO THIS. Your best bet would be to rip up the check and throw it away, or submit it to your local police department for investigation.

Why shouldn’t you deposit the check?

The check is phony. If you do not wait until the check clears and withdraw the money as soon as you deposit it, you will be sending the company your hard-earned cash, instead of their money. Then, you will be out the money you sent to them, in addition to anything your bank may charge you for over drafting.

It’s scary, but it can be avoided. Many times, if it’s too good to be true, it’s not real.

We were able to get a hold of one of these letters – check it out below with comments from us (in Snagajob orange) to show you some examples of why this is a scam.

Click the image for a larger version.

Online job seeker scam

 

Some of these scammers are getting elaborate in their schemes and will even have someone answer the phone when you call the number on the letter. As soon as you send them your money, the number will be disconnected and it will become difficult, if not impossible, to get in touch with them.

Whether it is through Snagajob or another job search tool, your safety is important to us. Please let us know if you have any concerns.

Watch out for this scammer

We’ve been pretty disturbed about reports that someone is emailing people pretending to be Snagajob and want to make sure you are aware of it. We take job searching seriously and this entire situation is really upsetting to us.

Occasionally you may receive an email from a Snagajob recruiter telling you about a job opening or hiring event that we think you should be aware of. Please note that these emails will ALWAYS have a link back to the Snagajob website pointing you to a legitimate job posting.

If you receive an email from someone claiming to be from Snagajob that does not have a link to a posting, do not respond to the email, it is a fake. It seems like these emails are being sent to registered and non-registered Snagajob members and we assure you that they did not get your email address from us. Make note that there is no Snagajob University Recruitment Team. Delete this email immediately.

Below is an example that someone sent to us. Remember, this is a scam.

Hello,
From the Snagajob University Recruitment Team we are pleased to inform you that the family of one Mr Chuami Yun (a Hong Kong expatriate working with Chevron Oil & Gas) is coming down to your location(St. Louis) for few weeks of supervisory works.They are in urgent need of a College/University female helper/nanny who would babysit their 2-year old little daughter by name Poshan.
They are offering a weekly pay of $500 with working days being Mondays-Fridays 6PM-9PM, weekends excluded.
If you are interested reply immediately so they can have you accessed before contracting your services.

Thank you for your cooperation

Snagajob Recruitment Team

How can you tell this email is a scam? There are a few ways:

1) We will always call you by your first name.

2) There is no link back to the Snagajob website to a real job posting.

3) The pay for this job is too good to be true. You would only be working 15 hours a week and making over $30 an hour.

4) We like to identify ourselves by our names. For example, you may receive an email from myself or one of my colleagues. We will always let you know which one of us is reaching out to you.

If I sound upset and passionate about this, it’s because I am. We are looking into this person/people and are doing everything we can to get them to stop.

As a general rule when looking for jobs, if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is. We are pretty good at making sure scammers stay off our site. If you are unsure about a posting, or if one did get through, please email a link to the posting to BeSafe@snagajob.com and our team will look into it. It is better to be safe than sorry!

4 steps to protect yourself on Facebook

Whether you agree with it or not, employers are looking at job applicants on Facebook. Not everyone does this, but you’ll want to be prepared either way. Anything from complaining about your former boss to inappropriate pictures to just being unprofessional can make a difference in your job search. The best thing you can do – make your profile as private as possible. Even if you don’t think you have anything to hide, it’s always a good idea to only have your friends and family view your page.

It seems like Facebook keeps changing their privacy settings. Below are four quick steps you can take to make sure the posts on your profile are pretty private and secure.

1) Click the lock on the top right of your Facebook page

You can use any of these shortcuts to make sure that your profile is private. Or, you can click “See More Settings” to view all of your privacy settings. I recommend clicking on that link so you can see everything in one place.

2) Check out where your settings currently stand

Next to the “Who can see my stuff” section, make sure the ‘Who can see your future posts?” setting is NOT set to public. You have the options of: Friends, Friends except Acquaintances, Only Me, Custom, or lists you have created within Facebook. If you are currently set on Public click the Edit button and change that ASAP.

Make sure the very last question “Do you want other search engines to link to your timeline?” is set to Off. You don’t want your Facebook profile showing up when someone searches for you online.

3) Limit who can see your old posts

This is important. While you’ve changed what people can see going forward, you need to make sure you update your settings to that your older posts are private as well. Click the “Limit Past Posts” link.

By limiting who can see your old posts, you will be making sure that future employers can’t go back into your Facebook history to take a look at your 21st birthday, trip to Vegas or the crazy rant you went on when you just needed to vent. Let’s be real, they don’t need to see that kind of stuff.

4) Test it out

Log out of your Facebook page (Gasp! It’s okay, you can log back in when we’re done) and do a quick internet search to see if you show up. Simply search your name + Facebook to see if you show up. If you do, check to see what your profile looks like. If it’s anything other than your profile and timeline photo, you need to go back to make sure all your settings are in place.

Remember, these steps tackle your posts only. We’ll go over making your photos private in another article. Keep in mind that your profile and timeline photos are important. Keep it professional and avoid anything where you look like you’re doing something illegal, inappropriate, or just gross.

It may not be fair, but how you project yourself on the internet can be seen by future employers and may come back to haunt you.

Want more detail? Check out Facebook’s help center for everything you need you know.

Speaking of Facebook, come join our page to say “Hi” and for some job search advice.

How to spot a scam

Searching for a job can be frustrating as it is, but add in that there are reports of scammers looking for job seekers, it takes the frustration to another level.

We do our best at Snagajob to keep scammers off our site. If you are unsure about a job posting, please contact us with your concerns. You can email besafe@snagajob.com, which goes directly to our Fraud Taskforce who will immediately look into the company.

Check cashing scams

One way scammers are targeting job seekers is through the mail. If you get a letter from a company you have never heard of and have never applied to, do some research before you accept any position. In some cases, they send checks with those letters, informing you that you have been hired as a secret shopper and the check is money to spend at different businesses. They ask you to deposit the check, leave some of the money as a “pay check” and then wire the rest to them. DON’T DO THIS. Your best bet would be to rip up the check and throw it away, or submit it to your local police department for investigation.

Why shouldn’t you deposit the check?

The check is phony. If you do not wait until the check clears and withdraw the money as soon as you deposit it, you will be sending the company your hard-earned cash, instead of their money. Then, you will be out the money you sent to them, in addition to anything your bank may charge you for over drafting.

It’s scary, but it can be avoided. Many times, if it’s too good to be true, it’s not real.

We were able to get a hold of one of these letters – check it out below with comments from us (in Snagajob orange) to show you some examples of why this is a scam.

Click the image for a larger version.

Online job seeker scam

 

Some of these scammers are getting elaborate in their schemes and will even have someone answer the phone when you call the number on the letter. As soon as you send them your money, the number will be disconnected and it will become difficult, if not impossible, to get in touch with them.

Whether it is through Snagajob or another job search tool, your safety is important to us. Please let us know if you have any concerns.

Isn’t it illegal to ask for my Social Security number?

Melissa asked on our blog:

“I have a serious question that’s been bothering me when I fill out certain apps. online. Why is it that some companies ask for your social security number before hiring and/or getting an interview; now to my knowledge I've read somewhere if a company ask for your SSN then it’s a SCAM, so can someone please enlighten me if this statement is accurate or not?”

Hi Melissa - Great question. Some companies will ask for your Social Security number to make sure you meet the minimum age requirement for the position. An example of this would be: Must be 18 or older to apply.

You should use your best judgement when applying for a job that asks you for this information. If it is for a smaller company that you have never heard of, do a quick Internet search to make sure the business is legit before providing this type of information. Try calling the company and explain that you are applying to a job with them, and would like to know how they are going to use your Social Security number.

If you are unsure about a posting on our site, send us the employer's information and a link to the posting you are interested in to besafe@snagajob.com and we'll investigate. We do our very best to keep scammers off the site, but if one got though we want to know so we can fix it.

Please note that if an employer asks you to send them any money, chances are it is a scam. If an employer you’ve never heard of, or never worked for, sends you a check, rip it up and cut off communication with them.

Get more tips for a safe job search in our Security Center.

How to defend yourself against 'phishing'

Email SafetyTips for protecting yourself from identity thieves and email scams.

While Snagajob is always extra vigilant when looking out for scams and schemes targeting our job seekers, we also wanted to give you a few pointers to help protect yourself from those looking to gain access to your personal information.

Phishing involves the use of fraudulent emails and copy-cat websites to attempt to trick you into revealing valuable personal information -- such as account numbers for banking, securities, mortgage, or credit accounts, your social security number, and the login IDs and passwords you use when accessing online financial service providers. This information is then often used in an attempt to steal your money, your identity or both.

Snagajob will never ask you to send your r?sum?, or any other personally identifiable information, via email to anyone.

(You can read more about our security here.)

If you ever receive an email like this, neither the email, nor the email address listed, is associated with Snagajob in any way.

All submissions to Snagajob are made via our website. We strongly suggest that you refrain from sending your r?sum?, or any other personally identifiable information, via email to anyone unless you are personally familiar with the addressee.

Safe job search tips

Safe online job searchDon't forget to research whether an employer is the right fit for you.

From everything you've heard about finding a job, it's always been about what an employer is looking for in a prospective employee: Do you have enough experience? Is your schedule flexible enough? Is your rust bucket of a car going to be able to make the commute back and forth all summer?

Well, did you ever stop and ask yourself whether an employer is right for you? If you're a vegan, are you comfortable flipping burgers? If you're a night owl, do you really think you can wake up to open the diner by 5 a.m.? If your family or friends have you warned about a dishonest, unscrupulous employer, will you listen?

Many job boards will post any and every job that’s submitted. But Snagajob is different. We don’t accept job postings that involve multi-level marketing or require financial investments up front. Still, when you’re applying for jobs it's a good idea to conduct your own background check on a company, especially if it’s unfamiliar. After all, employers run job applicants through a very rigorous screening process. Shouldn't you do the same?

Here is a helpful checklist to go through when deciding if an employer is a good match for you:

  • Do your homework: Check with the Better Business Bureau (www.bbb.org) to see if any complaints have been registered against a company you're interested in. If so, investigate the nature of these complaints. Even if they don't specifically relate to staff treatment, do you really want to work at a place where customers have cause to frequently gripe?
  • Exercise caution with work-from-home opportunities: These jobs are a great match for some job seekers, whether they're stay-at-home moms or someone looking to take on a second job. And while Snagajob features some of these work-from-home opportunities on our website, we caution all job seekers to read the full terms and conditions before pursuing these opportunities - that includes the fine print! Some of these jobs require you to make initial investments or perform other tasks that aren't normally associated with traditional jobs; be sure this is something you're comfortable with before pursuing these opportunities.
  • Get a little help from your friends (and family): We find that many Snagajob job seekers have been referred by family and friends who've successfully landed jobs with our help. Make sure to ask them about what made their job search experience so positive - and be sure to pass on your Snagajob experiences to family and friends, as well. We greatly appreciate it!
  • Be protective of personal info: Never give out passwords, Social Security numbers or other personal or financial information to someone sending you an email, even if the person or company sending the email has a familiar name. Also, do not respond to any suspicious emails. If a suspicious email contains an attachment or file, do not open it. Read more about security.

At Snagajob, we work hard to ensure that all our jobs are safe and credible opportunities. But with more than 300,000 jobs on our site - and new jobs daily - we also welcome our job seekers' questions and comments about the employment opportunities advertised through our website. We'll look into these issues and respond as soon as possible. Snagajob closely follows all job seeker feedback to identify patterns of complaints and take any needed action with employers. Good luck in your job search!

Interview safety

Advice about job interview scamsMary shared this close encounter with a potential job scam:

“I actually went to a place that was in a remote location, had a scheduled interview for like 5 p.m. Anyways I went to look for the place to make sure I knew where I was going… the place was an old business complex, with everything shut down, windows boarded up and everything… scary didn’t go to interview!”

Glad you listened to your gut on that one Mary! Showing up early for a job interview is great for a lot of reasons, but we usually recommending leaving early because it gives you time to:

1. Make sure you have the right location
2. Be certain you’re on time (or early) for the interview
3. Make time for the unexpected (getting lost, forgetting something you need,etc.)

But after hearing your story, we’re going to have to add one to the list:

4. Make sure your interview isn’t being held in a terrifyingly suspicious boarded-up building.

What should you do if you show up to a sketchy-looking interview location?

Listen to your instincts and leave. If you have left early there’s plenty of time to make sure you don’t have the wrong address, and though interviews are great opportunities, it’s simply not worth putting yourself at risk if something seems off.