Warehouse Supervisor Job Description

WHAT DO WAREHOUSE SUPERVISORS DO?

Warehouse supervisors are in charge of inventory in a warehouse or similar space. They lead a team of inventory or warehouse workers to receive and record new stock as it comes in, and move stock onto trucks or store shelves as needed. Warehouse supervisors interview and hire employees, create schedules, monitor stock levels at the warehouse and know when to replenish stock. Warehouse managers are focused on time, making sure every item of stock gets to its destination on time, and that there are no shortages on shelves. They make sure the equipment is regularly serviced and help train new employees. Depending on the job, warehouse supervisors may have similar duties to a scheduler or logistician.

HOW MUCH DO WAREHOUSE SUPERVISORS MAKE?

Again, this depends on where you work. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) warehouse associates in 2010 earned a median income of $10.85 per hour or $22,560. While schedulers in 2010 earned $34.04 an hour, or $70,800 annually. Inventory managers can expect wages somewhere between those numbers.

WHAT ARE THE EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS?

Employers will want candidates to have at least a bachelor's degree in business, logistics or management or similar. However, years of experience in the logistics, warehouse or inventory field, plus demonstrated management qualifications might suffice.

Those looking for a logistician/scheduler position will need at least an associate's degree in engineering or business.

JOB SKILLS AND REQUIREMENTS

  • Communication Skills: Warehouse supervisors will need to speak with coworkers and customers on a regular basis.
  • Leadership Skills: Warehouse supervisors will need to hire employees and resolve conflicts, as well as keep employees motivated and on-task.
  • Critical-Thinking Skills: Warehouse supervisors will need to devise plans of action and asses those plans regularly.
  • Organizational Skills: Multiple orders, people and many moving pieces will keep warehouse supervisors on their toes.
  • Problem-Solving Skills: Warehouse supervisors will need to be ready when problems arise, or be ready to anticipate problems before they happen.