Property Manager Job Description

WHAT DO PROPERTY MANAGERS DO?

Are you the type of person that always keeps their room clean? Do you still keep your action figures in the original packaging? Then you might find a career as a property manager.

Property managers look after buildings, housing, industrial spaces and other property to make sure it is in good working order, looks clean and well-maintained and everything is in working order. Depending on the type of real estate, property managers might interview potential renters to discuss leasing and property rules, collect rent or association fees, look after the building, arrange any needed repairs, look after groundskeeping, pay any municipal bills, answer complaints and concerns from tenants, create budgets and make sure the building complies with all laws.

HOW MUCH DO PROPERTY MANAGERS MAKE?

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) property, real estate and community association managers made a median hourly income of $24.75, or $51,480 per year.

WHAT ARE THE EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS?

A high school diploma is enough to get your foot in the door at some places, but a bachelor's degree or vocational real estate training is preferred. Degrees in business administration, finance, real estate or similar are very helpful.

It is also very useful to have experience in real estate sales, as you might need to work with potential renters or buyers. If you sell property, you will need a real estate license.

JOB SKILLS AND REQUIREMENTS

  • Customer Service Skills: Property managers work with tenants to make them happy, and work to get new tenants.
  • Negotiating Skills: Property managers will have to work out details with potential tenants, put bids out for work or service on the property, and deal with many people in the community.
  • Organizational Skills: There are many facets to a property manager's day. Working with tenants, with local government, with public works and paying bills. Organization to get it all done is key.
  • Communication Skills: Property managers often must speak with tenants, resolve disputes, entice new tenants, answer questions and hire workers. Good communication is key.

THE FUTURE OF PROPERTY MANAGERS

Job growth for property managers is slow, according to the BLS.